An Interview with the creators and stars of ‘Rick and Morty’ at SDCC

Spencer Grammer and Chris Parnell for RICK AND MORTY (Image Credit: Turner Broadcasting)
Spencer Grammer and Chris Parnell for RICK AND MORTY (Image Credit: Turner Broadcasting)

If you’re looking for spoilers about your favorite shows, San Diego Comic-Con is not the place to go, proven by Rick & Morty creators Dan Harmon and Justin Roiland. But the two, along with series stars Spencer Grammar and Chris Parnell, did share a few tidbits in regards to the popular Adult Swim show about the space and alternate universe adventures of an alcoholic scientist and his grandson to tide fans over until the Season 2 premiere.

On Season 2…

The first season of Rick & Morty followed a classic two-story element, one of which remained very grounded and domestic while the other would rely heavily on the sci-fi element.  This season will change that. “In Season 2, things get a little more intergalactic,” Harmon said. “We’ve been a little more fancy-free.”

“We’ve freed ourselves up to be sci-fi across the whole episode,” Roiland added.

Fans of the show can also look forward to more interesting pairings, unseen before on the show,  including more Rick, Morty and Summer together. “In Season 2, we sort of organically discovered in the writing process that there’s a lot of fun to be had putting the three of those guys together,” Roiland said.

And if you’ve been dying to see more multiverse action on the show, Grammar confirms that there will definitely be more on the way in Season 2, especially where Summer is concerned. “The first [episode] is definitely time traveling and multiverse stuff. It’s really cool, really fun and very enjoyable,” she said.

On what drew them to the show…

“I’d never really done any animation, and I’d been wanting to get into it,” Grammar said. “I feel like this is more where I can run the gambit of being sincere and funny at the same time. This is like adult humor, which definitely drew me to it.”

On the world of Sci-fi in Rick & Morty

“What’s more important to sci-fi is that people recognize a mythologized version of something that they have encountered in their lives,” Harmon said. “Like ‘Oh, this is a sci-fi version of a McDonald’s drive-thru’ or ‘Oh, this is a sci-fi version of a DMV.'”

“Dan [Harmon] does a great job of taking a sci-fi concept and grounding it in a really awesome, structurally stable narrative that’s more character-based,” Roiland complimented. “Like being able to look through people’s clothes, x-ray vision, other cool points of entry…And a lot of times, stories will start from that and then we’ll have a lot of fun and screw around in the writer’s room and then at a certain point we start to lock things down…And then everyone looks to Dan and ask how can we make this emotional and relateable.”

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I'm a book-addicted, TV-obsessed, Ohio University Bobcat for life who majored in smoothie consumption, Netflix and, oh yeah, journalism.

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