A television junkie’s outlook on the 2013 Golden Globe Awards!

Amy Poehler and Tina Fey (Image Credit: Gavin Bond/NBC)
Amy Poehler and Tina Fey (Image Credit: Gavin Bond/NBC)

Even though the night really belongs to the movies, the Golden Globe Awards often finds some of its best moments stemming from the television acknowledgements that are handed out by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. For the most part, this section of the awards is the only reason I tune in. My inner child has no use for the categories of Best Motion Picture (whether drama or comedy or musical), or for the same actors and actresses to be nominated in the same categories. It’s boring.

But the television awards offer something almost magical. Sure, you have your standard nominations like Boardwalk Empire and Breaking Bad that would get nominated even if the wardrobe department decided to dress everyone in bunny suits for the remained of the show, but there are also the actors and actresses that probably never expect to end up in that particular spotlight. And what’s even better is that sometimes, they win! When the speeches are heartfelt and no longer dry and expected, or when cast mates show so much genuine happiness and pride for a winner they know, that’s when I love watching the Golden Globe Awards.

Below are a few of my dream winners for the big night. For a complete list of nominees, check out the official website of the 2013 Golden Globe Awards and tune in Sunday at 8 p.m. to see who wins.

Connie Britton and Eric Close in NASHVILLE (Image Credit: Jon Lemay/ABC)
Connie Britton and Eric Close in NASHVILLE (Image Credit: Jon Lemay/ABC)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

Connie Britton (Nashville): Sure, I’ve never watched an episode of ABC’s country-filled drama, but I have watched Britton. And I’m under the opinion that the woman can act. She’s up against some stiff competition in her category, but the woman deserves to be recognized for her undeniable talent of making the smallest amount of tension in a scene feel ten times worse. The drama category is like her award-winning soulmate.

Jim Parsons and Kaley Cuoco in THE BIG BANG THEORY (Image Credit: Richard Cartwright/CBS)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Comedy or Musical

Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory): Even though Parsons has taken home this award before, I still hold firm to my belief that this man should win any award he is nominated for in relation to FOX’s version of Geek Heaven. Anyone who can spout out upper level dialogue that I can’t even hope to repeat while being hilariously obtuse and still keep a straight face deserves all the awards.

Jessica Lange in AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM (Image Credit: Frank Ockenfels/FX)
Jessica Lange in AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM (Image Credit: Frank Ockenfels/FX)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Jessica Lange (American Horror Story: Asylum): When it was first announced that the FX hit was going to be reusing the same actors in a completely different story for the second season of its hit thriller, I was skeptical. But Lange’s transformation from a deceptively-crazy neighbor in Season 1 to a vindictive, alcoholic nun in Season 2 sold me. Lange has the ability to break my heart, make me feel for her character’s plights and still loathe them with every fiber of my television-loving self.

Louise Brealey and Benedict Cumberbatch in SHERLOCK (Image Credit: Hartswood Films/BBC)
Louise Brealey and Benedict Cumberbatch in SHERLOCK (Image Credit: Hartswood Films/BBC)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock): Let’s face it. Anything that comes from the BBC is bound to trump American television giants. I say this because they aim to tell a story, rather than sell violence, sex and fame. Cumberbatch is one of the driving forces of that storytelling, compelling viewers to not only stay involved with the show while it is airing, but to also remain engaged during its hiatus periods. And with a show that lasts only three episodes per season, that hiatus can seem awfully long.

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I'm a book-addicted, TV-obsessed, Ohio University Bobcat for life who majored in smoothie consumption, Netflix and, oh yeah, journalism.

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