No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

Let’s cut to the chase. I’ve been single for a fairly long time now and I’m okay with that. Of course there have been those moments at 2 A.M. where I can’t sleep and think too much and have cried for no reason at all, but 99% of the time, I haven’t been bothered by it. I haven’t lived these past several years thinking “Oh no! I’m single!”. Instead I’ve been focused on a thousand other things. Being single didn’t define me, it was only one of several hundred words that could be used to vaguely describe me.

However, 24 was a turning point for everyone having something to say about my singledom. Apparently, 23 had been the last year I could be single without it being an area of concern. When I turned 24, that age brought with it a heightened interest in my love life. Too many friends and family members had something to say. “You’re too picky!” “There’s someone, don’t worry.” “Aren’t you lonely?” “Don’t settle, my niece didn’t meet someone until she was 45.” “Let me go through all of my friends to see if there’s someone who might be interested!” What the hell? Each new and uninvited comment from some friend or stranger about me being single led to a type of thought process I had never had before.

Everyone’s opinions started swaying the way I viewed my own love life. For a few months, I was in panic mode. I downloaded a dating app. I tried to work out why I was single with whoever was willing to listen. Maybe I had been single for too long, maybe I was too picky. Worst of all, I was starting to feel bad for myself. However, I wasn’t actively working on trying to change my relationship status. There was still that little inner voice screaming at me that I really did like being single and that I wasn’t looking for a relationship right now. When I started to write this article, it was supposed to be about the important benefits of dating yourself. The longer I thought about it, the more I realized that wasn’t sitting right with me. This piece would have come out as yet another article trying to provide validation as to why it is ok to be single. Being single is a choice, not something forced upon you. That right there is the catch to society’s view of singleness. It’s treated like a disease that needs to be cured. I’m writing this for all my fellow single people in the hopes that you will realize this is not the case, and you shouldn’t have to justify why you’re single to other people.

Like I’ve already said, being single is an active choice. If I really wanted to be in a relationship, chances are pretty high that I could be. But I don’t want to be. People write that off as me being picky. I call it going with my instinct. I don’t decide to hang out with someone based on some list of factors I’m trying to check off, I go with what my gut is telling me. If something doesn’t feel right to me, I say no. And I’m sure this is the way for many other single people who are being told they’re too picky. You’re not being picky, and you don’t have to defend why you are being picky. You know you better than anyone else, and you know what is best for you better than anyone else.

There’s also the slight chance that people just aren’t actively seeking out a partner. On my current list of priorities, finding a guy is not near the top, and I’m even less interested in trying to make something happen by force. People are all about organic these days. Eat organic, use organic soap, wear organic clothing, take organic medicine, blah, blah, blah. We’re a society that is so focused on organic products, yet when it comes to relationships, we’re so quick to turn to apps and asking for set ups in order to find some type of relationship instant gratification. What happened to the organic relationship? One that occurs naturally without the assistance of a distance locator and the option to swipe right or left? A better question, why should you have to tell people that’s what you’d prefer to happen? An even better question, why is everyone so focused on other people’s lives and relationships?

Here’s the thing, the people who are focused on you being single are solely focused on what you might be lacking as a single person. Please, dear concerned friends and family members, ease up on the concern. We singles do not want your pity, or sympathy. In fact, it’s almost insulting. You may see your intentions as helpful. You may think that finding me the perfect setup could be a top notch good deed to add to your list. But here’s the thing, unless we’re asking for your help, do not assume we need your help. Stop focusing on the empty space next to us when we walk into a room. Again, that’s an elected empty space. It doesn’t mean we are sad or lonely. It just means we’re doing our own thing.

And that’s a good thing! Being single means really getting to discover who we are. It may sound cliche, but it’s true. In my case, I see my twenties as a precious and valuable time of life. They’re a time to begin a career, nurture your hobbies, discover what types of people excite you, find out who you are and aren’t compatible with. Yes, you can do this with a partner, but you can also do it on your own. The friends I seek out and enjoy spending time with definitely have the qualities that I’ll probably hope to find in someone someday. Because I’m single, I have the time to invest in all of these areas. But again, I’m not here to provide validation for someone else, we’re only validating it for ourselves.

I’ve come back to a point where the only person I listen to when the topic of me being single comes up is myself. I appreciate the people who want to find someone special for me, but if I’m not worried about it, they shouldn’t be either. I’m embracing this time for what it is: a time to explore, to create, to dream, and to do whatever the heck it is thatI want to do. I’m selfish, but I’m ok with that! There will come a day when I’m ready to stop flying the single flag and I’ll readily give up my time for the sake of someone else, but  for right now, I’m enjoying it for all it’s worth. I hope all my fellow singles are as well. Don’t worry about what others say or think- they were all single at one point too, and as I’ve said, that was anything but a bad thing.

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‘Plus Size’ Celebs and the Obsession with Labeling Body Types

(Image Credit: Bravo Media, LLC)
(Image Credit: Bravo Media, LLC)

Everywhere we turn, women’s bodies are being judged. Everyone is either “too skinny” or “obese,” and figures on both ends of the spectrum are “unhealthy.” This judgmental behavior has become so popular that people seem to feel the need to put a label on all shapes and sizes.

Earlier this year, Glamour magazine put out a special issue in conjunction with Lane Bryant focusing on plus-size women. The beautiful Ashley Graham graced the cover, and women such as Melissa McCarthy, Adele, and Amy Schumer were featured.

As a woman who fluctuates from sizes 6 to 8, Amy wasn’t pleased that she was featured in this particular issue. She shared a post on her Instagram page letting her fans know that she doesn’t want “[y]oung girls seeing [her] body type and thinking that [it] is plus-size.” Because if a size 6 is overweight, then what is acceptable?

Friend to the comedian, Jennifer Lawrence, spoke out in light of the controversy in an interview with Harper’s Bazaar. She said that she doesn’t like that people consider her body type to be normal; she puts way too much work into her body for it to be normal, but we’re so accustomed to seeing underweight women that we think it’s the norm. This, in turn, makes us think of a normal body type as being a curvy but thin one.

Why are we so focused on judging other women? Social media makes it far too easy to do this publicly (and anonymously). If you go to any woman’s Instagram page with a large number of followers, you’re bound to see negative comments strewn about regarding her weight.

When did this become acceptable?

Another famous actress who has made it clear that she doesn’t want the focus to be on the size or shape of her body (ironically also featured in the Glamour plus-size issue) is Christina Hendricks. In an interview with the Sun-Herald, Christina’s “full-figured” body is referenced not once, but twice, and she is clearly displeased by the comment both times. Why would any highly-regarded actress want to be interviewed not about her incredible talents or current roles, but instead about her figure? Why does size matter to us so much?

In this era of body scrutiny, the lingerie company Aerie has tried to make a stand. They’ve stopped using standard “models” for their ads, and instead opt to use “real” girls. This means there are sizes being featured above a 4, stretch marks make appearances, and no airbrushing is done.

Until the real normal becomes the media’s definition of normal, it doesn’t seem girls will accept each other’s bodies or their own as being beautiful. We need to stop acting like the Kardashian waist-to-butt ratio is attainable (or like it’s anything that anyone should aim for) and start encouraging each other’s healthy, natural figures. More companies and influential media outlets need to stop allowing women to be placed into “skinny” and “fat” classifications and encourage all women to be proud of how they look, regardless of their weight.

Thigh Gap (Image Credit: Rui Santos)

The Unhealthy Quest for a Thigh Gap

Thigh Gap (Image Credit: Rui Santos)
Thigh Gap (Image Credit: Rui Santos)

It’s becoming more and more apparent that “the gap” is the root of all evil in the beauty industry. Not the clothing store Gap (although some may actually feel that way), but rather, the absolutely insane new obsession with having a “thigh gap”. For those unfamiliar, a “thigh gap” refers to exactly what it sounds like, a gap or space between your inner thighs.

Back in my day (I’m 21), girls got braces to fix gapped teeth and cursed their bowlegged thighs because they walked like an old school western cowboy.  Fast-forward to the present, and these same girls want to surgically separate their teeth and have rail-thin legs all for the sake of a gap.

Victoria's Secret Models (Image Credit: Victoria's Secret)
Victoria’s Secret Models (Image Credit: Victoria’s Secret)

Excuse me, but when did this become acceptable?  And why is it even a thing? When is the last time you heard someone say, “Yeah man, I love a girl with a nice ‘thigh gap’.”? The whole idea seems totally irrelevant to what makes someone attractive or not.

The most celebrated women in the world don’t even come close to having a space between their legs (think: Beyoncè, Christina Hendricks, Sofia Vergara), and it doesn’t stop anyone from calling them “beautiful”.  To those who have a natural “thigh gap”, that’s fantastic.  If you are like most of the female population that experiences the occasional thigh chaffing, who cares?  You’ll work a space into your thighs only to find that next season’s trend will be something equally ridiculous like “thigh friction”. You’ll be screwed then, huh?

The feminist in me wants to try and relate the “thigh gap” to the idea of a woman having her “legs open”, but it’s fairly apparent that this isn’t the case.  Instead, the “thigh gap” seems to be a satanic child of designers like Victoria’s Secret and Chanel who limit their runway models to women with a space down the center of their bodies…from their teeth to their thighs.

Beyonce (Image Credit: Ian Gavan/Getty Images for Gucci)
Beyonce (Image Credit: Ian Gavan/Getty Images for Gucci)

Maybe you’re thinking that guys have similar predicaments, what with the ideal of a “six-pack” and all that.  The difference here is that for a man to be in shape (by society’s standards), they need to be healthy.  “Six pack abs” don’t magically appear unless Photoshop is involved. They are actually a reward for having proper nutrition and exercise ethic.  Women, on the other hand, are pressured to have ridiculous features like “thigh gaps” which usually come with physical malnourishment and mental stress.  Just like there are tons of men who aren’t meant to have a six pack, there are millions of women who were not put on this earth to have a “thigh gap”. Add in the fact that a good majority of women, no matter how much they diet or work out, are physically incapable of having a “thigh gap” due to their anatomical structure and the ideal becomes even more ludicrous.

It’s a relief knowing that the “thigh gap” obsession will likely pass, along with the Sir Mix A lot-induced booty infatuation and the Pamela Anderson-esque breast fixation.  We know by now that when the fashion industry, or pop culture in general, focus on one part of the female anatomy… it’s likely to explode into an international plague of copycatting.  I suggest rubbing your thighs together loud and proud, because in reality…no one cares about a stupid space between your legs unless it’s a guy or girl trying to get in it and even then, if they’re not happy with what you’ve got, screw them (not literally, kick them to curb and find someone who appreciates your beauty).

Originally posted August 29, 2013.

#FreeKesha: The Outpouring of Support

(Image Credit: Instagram, iiswhoiis)
(Image Credit: Instagram, iiswhoiis)

Last week after Kesha’s trial, it was ruled that Sony would not terminate her contract with Dr. Luke. We saw videos of the pop star breaking down in tears and our collective heart broke for her. But soon after, there was an outpouring of support not just from fans, but from celebrities, too.

After the ruling, there was a wave of tweets condemning the ruling, sending positive vibes, and supporting Kesha entirely.

https://twitter.com/lorde/status/700792372385308672

After the kind words, some celebrities took bigger action in hopes of supporting Kesha. Taylor Swift donated $250,000 “to help with any of her financial needs during this trying time.

Musician Zedd offered to produce a song with Kesha.

However, Lady Gaga has been the most dedicated and vocal in her support for Kesha. At the Oscars she dedicated her performance of her song Til It Happens to You to Kesha. She brought rape survivors on stage and stood together in unity and made a very powerful and moving statement.

Kesha responded with a couple of tweets of her own.

Overall, Kesha’s situation is horrible and devastating, but the huge amount of support from celebrities and fans is astounding. It demonstrates how coming forward about abuse will not always be met with rumors and speculation, but with hope and support. Ideally, Kesha’s bravery and her supporters will inspire and comfort others in similar situations.

Beginning to Make Toys Right with #WheresRey

(Image Credit: LucasFilm)
(Image Credit: LucasFilm)

When Star Wars fans headed to stores for memorabilia, many of us couldn’t find the character we were looking for. Like Marvel’s Gamora and Black Widow before her, new heroine Rey had been left out of too many toy sets. Most egregious were a set of action figures that featured male leads Finn, Poe Dameron and Kylo Ren, along with Chewbacca and a generic pilot and Stormtrooper and the Millennium Falcon playset that featured Finn, Chewbacca and BB-8, even though Rey is the one to fly the ship in The Force Awakens.

But in spite of the growing hashtag campaign #WheresRey, the lack of Rey went largely unnoticed by the general public until recently when a tweet, featuring a letter from an 8-year-old who wanted toy manufacturer Hasbro to know “girls matter,” went viral. The letter was in response to Rey’s absence from the company’s Star Wars Monopoly game, where you can play as Finn, Kylo Ren, Darth Vader or Luke Skywalker (the latter two of whom either don’t or barely appear in the new movie).

Finally, Hasbro was forced to address the issue, but their official statement raised more questions than it answered. They told Entertainment Weekly: “The Star Wars: Monopoly game was released in September, months before the movie’s release, and Rey was not included to avoid revealing a key plot line that she takes on Kylo Ren and joins the Rebel Alliance.”

Admittedly, spoilers for The Force Awakens were a BIG DEAL in the days leading up to and directly following the film’s December release, and Disney even claims they planned this lack of Rey toys to avoid spoilers. In an interview, Paul Southern, head of licensing for Lucasfilm, said, “The fact that she was the ultimate heroine of the film was one of the significant plot points we did want to protect.” This makes a kind of sense, except apparently, the fact that Finn is also a hero of the movie wasn’t considered too spoiler-y.

As many fans have pointed out, including Rey in her scavenger outfit (which she wears almost all of the movie) shouldn’t have been considered a spoiler. Rey was a key figure in The Force Awakens’s trailer, and it only made sense that she was an important part of the movie. If this was solely related to the fact that Rey ends up with Luke Skywalker’s lightsaber and it awakens the force within her, the lightsaber didn’t have to be included in early-release toys.

Southern admits that the passion for Rey toys – which are selling “exceptionally well” at Target – caught Disney by surprise, saying, “The excitement around her is a lot more than we were expecting it to be.” Admitting there’s a problem is a good first step, and with Disney now releasing more Star Wars toys that feature Rey because The Force Awakens spoilers are less of a problem, it may seem like our worries over the missing Rey were unfounded.

But #WheresRey proved a point that fans have been making for years: we want female characters in our merchandise. If Disney – and by extension, Marvel – can finally see that in profit, the language they speak best, maybe we won’t need any more hashtag campaigns. Although I’ve got a bad feeling about leaving it up to the companies, we have made our voices heard. Disney and Hasbro have commented on this issue, so they have no more excuses.

While we wait to see if anything has been learned, rejoice in the Rey merch (new and old)! I picked out a few things that I need to run out to the store and get ASAP, so take a look at my list or check out Entertainment Weekly’s full rundown to figure out what you want.

Rey’s Speeder – Lego

Released prior to The Force Awakens, this Lego set helps you recreate Rey’s speeder from her time on Jakku. It comes with extra studs for you to shoot – although it’s probably not recommend you do what I would do and shoot them at people – and an adorable Rey Lego figure. Plus, the price isn’t half-bad for a Lego kit.

Bladebuilders: Rey’s Lightsaber – Hasbro

When I was kid (and honestly, also now), the number one thing I wanted was a lightsaber, and this one lights up and makes noises! This toy may just be a dream come true, as long as the price is right.

Itty Bittys: Rey – Hallmark

I already have several of these itty bitty stuffed animals, so I may be a little biased on this one. But take one look at Rey’s super cute face and tell me you don’t want one. Just go ahead and try.

Rey 3.75-inch Action Figure – Hasbro

The new Rey action figure features her in her “Resistance outfit” that she wears at the end of the movie, and it comes with a lightsaber for her to hold. Whether you end up getting this one or the scavenger version released in September, it’s a win for you either way.

Rey and BB-8 Elite Series Die Cast Action Figure – Disney

The latest version of Disney’s Rey action figure has her lightsaber, but it’s extra cool that you get her staff too. Besides, BB-8 comes along too, and how can you not want a tiny, adorable droid?

In all the controversy surrounding #WheresRey, perhaps TIME contributor Darlena Cunha said it best when she wrote:

“Little girls need to see themselves as heroes. Little girls need to see that they can grow up to be powerful and good. Little girls deserve a chance to imagine strength and perseverance in their own gender. They deserve someone to look up to.

Just as important, so do little boys. Little boys need to see that women are strong and fierce, and that women characters are just as magnetic as men characters. And they need confirmation of their inner monologue when they see a movie that shows just that. The merchandise should match that experience.”

Welcome to the world, Rey. Sadly, because of the current lack of diversity in toys, you may be our only hope at changing things around. But with any luck, in the future, you won’t be alone. May the Force be with us all.

Is Amy Schumer’s nude photo brave? We say YES!

(Image Credit: Pirelli)
(Image Credit: Pirelli)

By now, we’ve all seen the photo of Amy Schumer that will appear in next year’s Pirelli calendar. Apparently, my initial reaction to it was far mellower than the the rest of the world’s. I wasn’t overcome by shock, extreme joy, anger or disgust. I didn’t feel the earth move beneath my feet in a quake of feminist pride. Instead I felt a simple “good for you, Amy.”

Would I have given her a fist bump if we were on fist bump status? Yes. The funny girl’s doing her thang and GNF about it; I can respect that. And I can respect her choice to strip down, because why not? Hell, I can even respect that random cup of coffee she’s choosing to drink in nothing but heels and panties because, let’s face it, we all like to feel like a badass bitch sometimes who will do whatever she wants, even if that means just wearing a killer pair of heels and skimpy underwear while drinking a chai latte. What I can’t respect is the the ridiculous backlash she is receiving, and how the use of the word “brave” to describe the photo has backfired in the worst way possible.

A lot of people were delighted when they saw Schumer’s photo, along with its witty caption of “Beautiful, gross, strong, thin, fat, pretty, ugly, sexy, disgusting, flawless, woman.” The adjectives Schumer threw out there were a list of words that could easily be hurled at the photograph, based on whoever was looking at it. Some people might be fans, some might be critics, some might be neutral, but all would have something to say. Instead of waiting for it, she presented it, realizing that everyone has their own views and opinions. Lo and behold, the public had a lot to say about it, and just as Schumer’s caption predicted, there was no general consensus.

As a woman who from time to time struggles with my own body image, I saw Schumer’s photo and was happy. Sweet, I thought, here’s a woman who more what the general population can relate to. She’s not a size zero model, she doesn’t have Kim Kardashian’s ass, and she likes Chipotle and beer just as much as the rest of us. She’s a busy woman, like many women are, whose main priority is not the gym, but the other hundreds of things she still doesn’t really have the time to do. She was owning who she was, and most importantly, she wasn’t ashamed of who she was or what “flaws” she might have as decided by the world of Hollywood and fashion magazines. Some people even ventured to call what she did “brave.”

The word brave, like most words, has several connotations. Here are two of them.

  1. ADJECTIVE

ready to face and endure danger or pain; showing courage:“a brave soldier”

  1. VERB

to endure or face (unpleasant conditions or behavior) without showing fear

The first definition describes a person. The second describes what a person does. People who are brave often do show courage, and in more extreme cases, they willingly face and endure danger or pain. People who brave something do things that they know may result in unpleasant consequences, but they forge forward anyway to take a stance or to prove a point.

Upon hearing that people thought Amy Schumer was “brave” for her actions, haters jumped all over the topic. The adjective brave should be reserved for only certain types of people: soldiers, police officers, firefighters, cancer fighters – just to name a few. And I agree- this is a word that we shouldn’t use lightly. You don’t apply it to every little thing. You don’t want to generalize its meaning. But do we not also use this word as a form of encouragement? When young kids are afraid to be themselves, do we not tell them to be brave? When our friends embark on a new journey, is brave an inappropriate way to label their actions? Did Sara Barielles not write a smash hit that implores all of us to do brave things in our everyday lives?

Amy Schumer posing nearly naked for a magazine is not the bravest thing anyone has ever done by a long shot. What’s brave is that she was willing to brave the onslaught of criticism and nasty remarks that were to come her way. What’s brave is the giant middle, finger she’s giving to any man or woman that tries to tell her that her body is not the ideal type. While the topic was trending on Facebook, one popular Facebook personality took it upon himself to comment on the photo, saying there was nothing brave about posting a disgusting photo of yourself. He went on  to call Schumer fat, ugly, and lazy, comparing her to women who “take care of themselves.” He completely demeaned the woman, acting like no person on Earth could ever find her physically attractive. THIS is why Amy is brave, you POS – for posting a photo that would receive such confidence-shattering slander as the garbage you posted. What makes her BRAVE is for not letting the millions of comments like yours break her.

Schumer was not posing for this picture so others would call her the sexiest woman on the planet, she posed for the picture to show that it’s ok to consider yourself a beautiful and strong woman who doesn’t need the confirmation of others to make herself feel so. Women as a whole need to stop analyzing what everyone and their mother thinks – anyone who has the time to try to bring you down is clearly lacking something in their own life. It’s been shouted at us for years that everyone comes in different shapes and sizes, and we can preach the idea as much as we want. We can go on to tell others that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, or we can start to live it and stop passing off judgement on others.

You are brave Amy, just like a million other people who have gone out on a limb to prove a point. Thanks for showing us what it is to be a self-assured and confident woman who doesn’t need the approval of anyone else to tell her that she rocks.

Essena O’Neill: Social Media is Not Real

Essena O’Neill: Social Media is Not RealRecently the internet has been blowing up about Essena O’Neill quitting social media. She deleted her very popular Tumblr page and edited many of the captions of her pictures on Instagram.

For example, in this picture on Instagram, the model wrote about being paid to promote a tanning product and how appearance on social media is deceiving and should not be something to strive for.

She also posted a 12 minute video on Vimeo explaining why she decided to quit social media. She says that followers and likes cause insecurity and leads to never being satisfied with yourself.

There have been two sides responding to O’Neill’s message this week. Some applaud her and support her advocating for people to stop viewing social media as if it’s realistic because a lot of work and effort goes into those pictures and often they are the opposite of natural. On the other hand, critics of the model have been slamming her, as they believe this whole ordeal involving the model is just a publicity stunt in order to gain more popularity. Whether they are right about O’Neill’s intentions or not is unclear, but the model has definitely gained more followers on her Instagram and YouTube account.

However, if young and impressionable girls and boys see O’Neill’s message and realize that their worth is not measured by their appearance, followers, or likes on social media, then her anti-social media campaign will have accomplished a step in the right direction.

Real Women Have Curves: Not

(Image Credit: Iordani)
(Image Credit: Iordani)

Sure, “real women have curves.” But some real women don’t have curves. And that’s okay, but saying that women are only “real” if they fit one body stereotype or another is completely not okay. In fact, it’s entirely hypocritical and it isn’t helping improve the situation on either side of the spectrum whatsoever. Continue reading “Real Women Have Curves: Not”

Social Media, Anxiety and YOU

(Image Credit: ViewApart)
(Image Credit: ViewApart)

“Did someone like my status? Or see my newest picture on Instagram?” “I know I didn’t get a notification, but it won’t hurt to check just to be absolutely completely sure that nothing new happened on Facebook.” Yes, I’m one of those people. Someone who checks his social media accounts periodically, even when he knows decently well that nothing has happened. Rationally, I know it seems like borderline insane behavior – or at least the behavior of someone who is very anxious. But, at the same time, I know plenty of people just like me… Is social media making us crazy? Continue reading “Social Media, Anxiety and YOU”

What It Means To Be A ‘Real Woman’

(Image Credit: Shock)
(Image Credit: Shock)

I previously wrote an article on what it means to be a “real man.” The media defines “real men” differently than I do, and depending on the culture that we’re raised in, that definition will vary to some degree. Ultimately the gist was, men are faced with enormous pressure to embody traits of “masculinity” that are damaging to themselves and their relationships with others. The same is also true for women. It’s our job, whatever gender, to challenge those expectations, many of which are unhealthy and outdated. Continue reading “What It Means To Be A ‘Real Woman’”

Ashleeeybash: My reaction to Hollaback! Collaborating with ModCloth

(Image Credit: Ashley Bulayo / The Daily Quirk)
(Image Credit: Ashley Bulayo / The Daily Quirk)

We’ve all, in one way or another, experienced street harassment, and it’s so annoying. Enough is enough. When I found this little email in my inbox, I jumped at the thought of it and figured this would be great to really talk openly about because I’ve experienced it and it’s not fun. At all. Let me hear your stories down below! Continue reading “Ashleeeybash: My reaction to Hollaback! Collaborating with ModCloth”

Hollaback! and ModCloth take on street harrassment

(Image Credit: ModCloth)
(Image Credit: ModCloth)

As you may or may not know, I run my own YouTube channel and I feature one specific thing on Fridays: fashion. So, when I was approached with this opportunity to write about this topic regarding street harassment and “dressing for yourself,” I was all for it. Continue reading “Hollaback! and ModCloth take on street harrassment”

Unruly Women in Media: Katniss Everdeen of ‘The Hunger Games’

Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in THE HUNGER GAMES (Image Credit: Lionsgate)
Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in THE HUNGER GAMES (Image Credit: Lionsgate)

Welcome to the final installment of the Unruly Women series! Thus far, we’ve looked at women from the ‘60s, ‘90s and present day. This week, we’re jumping way ahead and analyzing everyone’s favorite futuristic heroine, Katniss Everdeen. Continue reading “Unruly Women in Media: Katniss Everdeen of ‘The Hunger Games’”

Unruly Women in Media: The Ladies of ‘Broad City’

Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer in BROAD CITY (Image Credit: Comedy Central)
Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer in BROAD CITY (Image Credit: Comedy Central)

Hello, and welcome back to the Unruly Women series! Last week, we looked at Samantha Jones, the overtly sexual, successful, Manhattan woman from Sex and the City. This week, we’ll be talking about two Manhattan girls who have the blatant sexuality of Samantha, but are nowhere near as well off, and have about a 20-year age gap with the notorious socialite. I’m talking about the one and only power duo, Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer from Broad City. Continue reading “Unruly Women in Media: The Ladies of ‘Broad City’”