How to Stop Thinking About an Off-Limits Crush

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Just like how I was born to write about why I love being single, I am the exact person to write this article about different ways to stop thinking about the crush you can’t date. Why? Because news flash! We live in an imperfect world where not every girl/guy gets the girl/guy at the end of the movie. Otherwise known as… My life.

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No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

No Boyfriend. No Girlfriend. No Problem!

Let’s cut to the chase. I’ve been single for a fairly long time now and I’m okay with that. Of course there have been those moments at 2 A.M. where I can’t sleep and think too much and have cried for no reason at all, but 99% of the time, I haven’t been bothered by it. I haven’t lived these past several years thinking “Oh no! I’m single!”. Instead I’ve been focused on a thousand other things. Being single didn’t define me, it was only one of several hundred words that could be used to vaguely describe me.

However, 24 was a turning point for everyone having something to say about my singledom. Apparently, 23 had been the last year I could be single without it being an area of concern. When I turned 24, that age brought with it a heightened interest in my love life. Too many friends and family members had something to say. “You’re too picky!” “There’s someone, don’t worry.” “Aren’t you lonely?” “Don’t settle, my niece didn’t meet someone until she was 45.” “Let me go through all of my friends to see if there’s someone who might be interested!” What the hell? Each new and uninvited comment from some friend or stranger about me being single led to a type of thought process I had never had before.

Everyone’s opinions started swaying the way I viewed my own love life. For a few months, I was in panic mode. I downloaded a dating app. I tried to work out why I was single with whoever was willing to listen. Maybe I had been single for too long, maybe I was too picky. Worst of all, I was starting to feel bad for myself. However, I wasn’t actively working on trying to change my relationship status. There was still that little inner voice screaming at me that I really did like being single and that I wasn’t looking for a relationship right now. When I started to write this article, it was supposed to be about the important benefits of dating yourself. The longer I thought about it, the more I realized that wasn’t sitting right with me. This piece would have come out as yet another article trying to provide validation as to why it is ok to be single. Being single is a choice, not something forced upon you. That right there is the catch to society’s view of singleness. It’s treated like a disease that needs to be cured. I’m writing this for all my fellow single people in the hopes that you will realize this is not the case, and you shouldn’t have to justify why you’re single to other people.

Like I’ve already said, being single is an active choice. If I really wanted to be in a relationship, chances are pretty high that I could be. But I don’t want to be. People write that off as me being picky. I call it going with my instinct. I don’t decide to hang out with someone based on some list of factors I’m trying to check off, I go with what my gut is telling me. If something doesn’t feel right to me, I say no. And I’m sure this is the way for many other single people who are being told they’re too picky. You’re not being picky, and you don’t have to defend why you are being picky. You know you better than anyone else, and you know what is best for you better than anyone else.

There’s also the slight chance that people just aren’t actively seeking out a partner. On my current list of priorities, finding a guy is not near the top, and I’m even less interested in trying to make something happen by force. People are all about organic these days. Eat organic, use organic soap, wear organic clothing, take organic medicine, blah, blah, blah. We’re a society that is so focused on organic products, yet when it comes to relationships, we’re so quick to turn to apps and asking for set ups in order to find some type of relationship instant gratification. What happened to the organic relationship? One that occurs naturally without the assistance of a distance locator and the option to swipe right or left? A better question, why should you have to tell people that’s what you’d prefer to happen? An even better question, why is everyone so focused on other people’s lives and relationships?

Here’s the thing, the people who are focused on you being single are solely focused on what you might be lacking as a single person. Please, dear concerned friends and family members, ease up on the concern. We singles do not want your pity, or sympathy. In fact, it’s almost insulting. You may see your intentions as helpful. You may think that finding me the perfect setup could be a top notch good deed to add to your list. But here’s the thing, unless we’re asking for your help, do not assume we need your help. Stop focusing on the empty space next to us when we walk into a room. Again, that’s an elected empty space. It doesn’t mean we are sad or lonely. It just means we’re doing our own thing.

And that’s a good thing! Being single means really getting to discover who we are. It may sound cliche, but it’s true. In my case, I see my twenties as a precious and valuable time of life. They’re a time to begin a career, nurture your hobbies, discover what types of people excite you, find out who you are and aren’t compatible with. Yes, you can do this with a partner, but you can also do it on your own. The friends I seek out and enjoy spending time with definitely have the qualities that I’ll probably hope to find in someone someday. Because I’m single, I have the time to invest in all of these areas. But again, I’m not here to provide validation for someone else, we’re only validating it for ourselves.

I’ve come back to a point where the only person I listen to when the topic of me being single comes up is myself. I appreciate the people who want to find someone special for me, but if I’m not worried about it, they shouldn’t be either. I’m embracing this time for what it is: a time to explore, to create, to dream, and to do whatever the heck it is thatI want to do. I’m selfish, but I’m ok with that! There will come a day when I’m ready to stop flying the single flag and I’ll readily give up my time for the sake of someone else, but  for right now, I’m enjoying it for all it’s worth. I hope all my fellow singles are as well. Don’t worry about what others say or think- they were all single at one point too, and as I’ve said, that was anything but a bad thing.

Why I Love Being Single

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I was born to write this article. I’m confident enough to even say that this is something that should be written on my tombstone. I love being single. Of course, I get those “Oh, aren’t you lonely?” “Don’t you want a boyfriend?” questions and remarks. Trust me, I’ve dedicated a whole YouTube video to it, which I suggest you watch if you haven’t yet. Anyway, do I care? No. Is it annoying? Yeah, but you live with it. I always anticipate questions or concerns coming from left and right since it seems to be most people’s life duty to find a mate in life. YOU DO YOU, BOO BOO. YOU GO GET HER/HIM, GLEN COCO.

But for me? I’m living and enjoying that single life for as long as I can. I’ve dated, sure…in high school. I’ve had multiple crushes in life but never did anything about it because I’m a wimp. TBH, I’ve been single for pretty much all my life. Are we going to include middle school relationships? No, because are those REAL relationships? Not really. Those are the relationships where you’re like: “Alright, see you at school tomorrow. I’m awkward and in my growing stage. OK. Let’s hold hands.”

The thing that gets me the most is that people think that being single is a curse or you’re just so unhappy. News flash! I’m 99.9% sure I wouldn’t be able to do so many things in my life if I had a significant other. I’m enjoying making my own decisions, learning how to be OK with going to things alone and accepting the fact I’ll always be the third/fifth/seventh wheel in any dating situation.

Being single lets me have FUN. I can go talk to whoever I want without the necessary feeling that someone back home is judging me because I’d be considering cheating on them. My friends pass me to the cute guys since they know for a fact they can’t go after them. (Cue the How I met Your Mother: “Haaaaave you met Ashley?) You could be that one friend who is able to go places while your coupled friends respond, “Oh, I wish I could but we already made plans with so and so.” WELL, your loss.

You build a thicker skin when you’re single. You’re gonna have to learn how to go to things by yourself and not feel like the ultimate loser in the room for not bringing anyone with you but it’s the price you pay. Heck, some people will look up to you for being so confident about yourself which is something I would never take back….Unless Chris Evans changes the game and suddenly wants to date me, but I digress.

Another reason being single is awesome is knowing the attention I would have given to someone I was dating is solely going to my family, friends and dog. My dog gets his own category. I’m focused on building my bonds with my close ones and I’m okay with knowing I’ll be the shoulder people cry on when they’re going through a hard time with THEIR boyfriend or girlfriend. I probably give the worst advice ever but at least they know I’m there to just listen.

So don’t think the single life is the worst life. Go by my motto: SINGLE LIFE IS THE BEST LIFE. But again, if Chris Evans knocks at my door, I’ll drop all of this in a heartbeat and marry him right then and there.