How to stop thinking about work on the weekends!

Weekends (Image Credit: Mark Sebastian)

Weekends (Image Credit: Mark Sebastian)

Is it possible to stop thinking about work on the weekends? Perhaps not entirely, as you probably know. However, if you’re thinking about work on the weekends, odds are you care about your work, meaning you probably have a pretty decent work ethic. So, take a step back, and realize that the weekend is a time for you to breathe. While you may be nervous to shift some of that work stress off your shoulders next weekend, you can check out some of the tips below for help. Go ahead, it’s ok. Continue reading

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Internship Etiquette

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I’ve done a number of internships in my day. I’m still doing some at the moment actually. I mean, check out my LinkedIn if you think I’m lying, and while you’re at it, I don’t mind if you leave me an endorsement. So, you can say I’m very familiar with the do’s and don’ts of internship etiquette. Here are some of the best tips for when you finally land an internship:

  • Dress to impress. You probably already know this off the bat but you’d be surprised how many people still show up unpresentable. I’m not saying come in your best club outfit, but get a scope of the company you’re interning for. Are people wearing jeans and sneakers? Or, are people dressed in slacks and midi skirts? The last thing you want is to stick out like a sore thumb.
  • Ask questions. You’ll feel stupid for asking a question that seems obvious, but you’ll feel even more stupid if you didn’t do something right the first time because you didn’t ask for clarification. The worst that could happen is that they think you’re incompetent, which is most likely not going to happen. More times than not, they’ll appreciate you taking the time to ask the question.
  • Take on internships for experience and not for the pay. Honey, if all the internships I took paid me, I’d be stinking rich, but that’s just not the case with most opportunities. A lot of people look past internships if they don’t pay, but that shouldn’t matter when it comes time to make a decision. I was ready for gaining experience, which lead me to more and more opportunities. Come on, I started at So Fetch Daily (formerly The Daily Quirk) as an intern and now look at me. This position alone has been brought up in countless job interviews in the past. I could literally talk for hours about everything I’ve done for this site.
  • Don’t be scared to take on projects that intimidate you. You might not know how to tackle the new project, it might even feel as if it will make or break your position, but how else will you learn?
  • Always look busy. Don’t sit there on your phone because it’ll seem like you’re not committed. Even when you literally asked everyone if they need help or for assistance on a project, you better find something to do… even if that means cleaning your desk for no reason.
  • You’re not above coffee runs. You’re the intern. You do what is asked of you even if it is fetching coffee. Your time will come eventually but for now, you gotta pay your dues.
  • Don’t go in with the mindset that you’re “just the intern.” There’s often a negative stigma around the title but an intern is just as important as everyone else contributing to the team. After all, they have given you projects that they want you to complete that are important to the company.
  • Practice your communication skills. Look, being the new kid and the intern is intimidating as hell. Don’t let that get to your head. Work with other people in the building other than those in the department you’re enrolled for. You never know what might happen.
  • Keep your phone on you at all times. Doesn’t matter if you’re interning as a sock collector (if that’s even a thing), you never know who will call you at the most random time for some help.
  • There’s a place for quirkiness and a time for seriousness. Don’t mistake your friendly banters with your boss and co-interns as something that you can take advantage of. No matter what, there is still that hierarchy system and you still need to respect everyone. They’re not your best friend. They’re your mentor.

There are many more words of wisdom that could be useful but if I wrote them all this list would be never ending. However, if you want more tips, feel free to reach me via Twitter. Speaking of that, always remember to network, because any connection you make from now on is important. Good luck, interns. You got it.

10 Things You Should Never Do at Work

(Image Credit: Olly)

(Image Credit: Olly)

So you got a new job? Congrats! Working in a new place is exciting, but also a big adjustment. If you’re unsure of how to present yourself, avoid an awkward  faux pas and check out this list of 10 Things You Should Never Do at Work so you at least know what not to do. Continue reading

Your First Time: Teaching

(Image Credit: Johoo)

(Image Credit: Johoo)

The night before my first day as a teacher was one of the most restless nights I’ve ever had. Every question I could have possibly asked myself, I did. Did I prepare enough? Will I at least sound like I know what I’m talking about if I didn’t? Will these kids even care about what I had to say? Will they learn anything? What if I trip in front of them? What if I go blank? Will I still be throwing up tomorrow (side note- I had borderline pneumonia that first week without knowing it and had started throwing up that afternoon as a side effect- best luck ever!) What is the difference between a gerund and a participle? Why did they hire me? What the hell have I gotten myself into? And on, and on, and exhaustingly on. By the time I fell asleep, my alarm was pretty much going off. Thankfully, adrenaline kicked in when I needed it most. Continue reading

The Importance of Building a Relationship with Your College Professors

(Image Credit: Tyler Olson)

(Image Credit: Tyler Olson)

In high school, getting better acquainted with your teachers happened without you really having to try. You saw them every day for an hour, sometimes two. They had you in class for a full year and maybe even in a study hall. In college, your professors are a bit different. If you’re in a seminar, chances are you’re just a number on a list of 200 kids. In your smaller classes, your professor will most likely get to know your name, but it’s up to you to get them to remember you once the semester is over. It can definitely be intimidating to try to establish the type of professional relationship with a professor that may have developed easily with your high school teachers, but know that the vast majority of professors out there are eager to get to know their students. To develop a professional relationship with your professor be an active participant in class, actually go to the office hours they constantly talk about and don’t be nervous to have a one-on-one conversation. Here are five reasons you’ll be glad you did! Continue reading

Your First Time…Working in an Office

(Image Credit: Wavebreak Media Micro)

(Image Credit: Wavebreak Media Micro)

Today you woke up at 6:30 a.m. for the first time since your torturous high school years, but still managed to make it out of the house on time wearing dress pants and a silky blouse. And after fighting with your chair to adjust it to the correct height, you’re now seated comfortably at your desk. Your desk! How did this happen? Are the powers that be giving jobs to small children these days?
As it turns out, while you may be a perpetual 10-year-old in your mind, your degree states that you’re now qualified to do an adult job. Which is absurd, of course. But you’ve got to fake it until you make it, right? Here are a few tips on how to navigate your first time working in an office. Continue reading

Your First Time… Trying to become a model with expert advice from CariDee English of ANTM

(Image Credit: CariDee English)

(Image Credit: CariDee English)

The Daily Quirk is very proud to present our newest series where we talk to experts in certain fields to give women advice on trying to accomplish different things for the very first time whether it be acting, singing or maybe even an Olympic champion. Who knows? In this installment, we are calling out to all the girls who aspire to be a model. Let’s be honest. Modeling is a tough industry. It may seem so “easy” to do but when you think about it, there are so many factors that go into this career that you don’t think of right away.

We turned to expert model CariDee English for advice for those who want to become a model. Check out what she had to say about her own experiences, her advice on improving modeling skills and how to manage such a demanding career.

The Daily Quirk: When did you first decide you wanted to model?

CariDee English: Well, I think it’s really important that if women want to get into modeling, they should definitely do it because they love the art of it. I knew I wanted to perform — it wasn’t so much modeling, but — the vessel was modeling, but I loved being able to take pictures and have my picture taken. I just felt so amazing being able to dress up as this character and the challenge of trying to sell that within one frame. I mean, I remember being like five years old and going into my garden dressed up and have my mom’s old 35 millimeter and she’d take pictures of me. I just remember loving that feeling.

TDQ: What do you think is the most important first step for young women who decide they would like to enter the field?

CE: The most important step is to know why you’re going into it. You don’t have to have like a set answer but if you love fashion or if you love the style or if you wanna travel, know why so you know what to keep on when you go through the career. The career is full of ups and downs and rejections. You gotta separate your body from yourself because you’re being judged on your body although it’s not your own personal opinion. It’s somebody else’s for work. Have a very, very strong sense of self as much as you can before getting in. I guess the other first step is just to get some test shots done. Don’t pay anybody an outrageous amount. If you’re with an agency, they should pay for your first test shot which basically is just a photoshoot showing you in a swimsuit and how you are in front of the camera to build a book.

TDQ: You did mention about the industry being harsh and critical, what advice can you give women about remaining happy and comfortable in their own skin while trying to make it as a model?

CE: Definitely have an identity outside of it. I had a wonderful relationship when I first started modeling. That definitely helped to have that friendship and companionship out. I’m an aunt so I really attached myself to family if I wasn’t working to give myself some sort of love and support that wasn’t just all about modeling. It’s important to have another thing that you do outside of it. I also do music which is a great relief. That’s something that keeps me serene, fulfilled and satisfied when I’m not working.

TDQ: I’m just curious, what kind of instrument do you play?

CE: I play drums and I sing. I can play a little bit of everything but my favorite are drums and singing.

TDQ: What do you suggest aspiring models do to increase their chances of getting booked?

CE: Keep on top of your body in a healthy way. It’s so funny. The fashion industry, as far as doing runway, the body measurements are different requirements. For commercial print modeling, you can be a little bit more yourself but it’s definitely a balance of working out, taking care of your body, but not in a way that’s too obsessive because you have to remember that you are human every day. They make models look almost superhuman and mannequin-like but there’s a lot of post. So, the best way to do it and approach [it] is to take care of your body. Don’t go into extreme because that’s just gonna bite you in the ass later. Just a little bit every day, a little bit of work every day. A little cardio. A little this and that. It’ll just set you up in the long run so whenever you’re ready to shoot, you’ll feel ready and not pressured. I’ve done both. I’ve set myself before, I’m working out all the time. I feel great when I’m getting out of a shoot then I’ve set myself up where it’s crunch time and it’s been a weekend of things that weren’t healthy. That’s just not a way to enjoy your job.

TDQ: Is establishing a personal style or brand important?

CE: Yes. It is. That’s the whole reason I decided to do [America’s Next Top Model] because after four years of so much rejection because of my skin, nobody would take me seriously or sign on. I decided to brand and get as much exposure as quickly as possible. I realized that going on that TV show and that route would have been the best way. I think branding is really important because yes, it’s modeling, but you can also branch off to all these other things like I do with music and with psoriasis. I mean, just a little bit of everything makes a well-rounded artist happy.

TDQ: Can you tell us a bit about your own personal style?

CE: My personal style is definitely simple-rocker-chic? If that’s a word. [laughs] Since my personality is so big, I don’t like to do a lot of big, bold prints. I like to keep it very simple black. Leather pants, black pants, white top, black top. Lots of blacks and whites in my world and mostly all black.

TDQ: What’s the best way for young women to improve their modeling skills?

CE: Practice makes perfect. So, take classes in your workout that are body conscious. Like, ballet barre is a great one because you have to keep your toes pointed, you have to keep your neck up and you have to keep a very great posture throughout the workout. That transcends when you have to go onto a shoot, you’re like, ‘Oh! You gotta keep your upper body really beautiful while your legs are jumping in the air or something.’ It’s important to know that modeling is action although it only is one shot; it’s a very athletic job. So, in order for that to be a great translation onto film, be in movement outside of work so when you get into work, you can bounce around.

TDQ: Modeling can also be a very demanding career choice. Can you tell me a bit about what people may not realize goes into the job?

CE: God, everything. The great thing is that agents are there to help you but they also take a big chunk of your money. Obviously for a good reason because they help you get the gigs. I realized that people are like, ‘Oh, I’m gonna make so much money. This shoot is one thousand bucks.’ But then, you gotta take your agent and your manager’s percentage out so always keep in mind that it’s important to save. I don’t wanna say anything hard because it’s great to wake up early and go shoot and be athletic. I think it’s the most important thing is to really be an athlete outside of work because you are when you’re inside of work. You get treated like one. You got long hours. You’re traveling. Sleep is important. Eating is important. So look at it more as almost being an athlete inside fashion.

TDQ: How do you balance the demands of your career with your personal life?

CE: I think if you just love what you do, it doesn’t feel like I have to balance. I just go to work when I need to get it done ‘cause I enjoy it and I love that it’s an escape for me. My personal life is also an escape and I enjoy it so it’s really important that if you’re not loving what you’re doing then maybe you should consider something else. Don’t do something just because you can, just because you are tall or something and people tell you that you should model. If you don’t like it, don’t do it. You know? Life is too short to be miserable and to do what other people expect you to do. So just make sure the balance is loving both things that you put yourself into.

TDQ: And lastly, can you give aspiring models some words of advice on how to do so as well?

CE: Yes! Don’t compare yourself to other models unless it’s somebody that inspires you. Not somebody that, you know, you feel that you’re not superior to or that they’re superior. Don’t go constantly looking at other models and comparing yourself because that’s just not healthy. That’s not gonna help you. Always know that your craft is your craft. Do everything you can to be the best you can be and also don’t pay for anything. Don’t do those things where people are like, ‘Oh! You can model if you pay us $10,000 for all these sittings.’ It’s not worth it in the long run. You gotta be realistic about what the modeling industry is. It’s not about being 5’9’ and tall, skinny, beautiful. There’s lots of women that are in it but just know that when you get into it, it’s the business with a lot of nos and a few yeses. Yeses make up for the a lot of nos. It’s just very important that when you get that yes, you work harder and you don’t rush on it. And through the no, you just flick them off and keep going.

I don’t know about you but does anyone want to get into modeling after reading all of this?  

The Daily Quirk would like to thank CariDee English for taking the time chat! To find out more about English, you can follow her on Twitter or Instagram. Let us know if this inspired you or which expert you’d love to hear from for our next installment of “Your First Time.”

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5 Ways to Make Your Commute Count

(Image Credit: LoloStock)

(Image Credit: LoloStock)

If you’re like me, you love your job. What you might not be as fond of is the amount of time it takes you to get there. Whether you take a car, train, bus or ferry to work, for most people, the time they spend commuting is time they will never get back to do other things. Luckily, there are ways to get things done during your commute and make that time count. Continue reading

How (Not) to Decorate Your Cubicle

(Image Credit: Rawpixel)

(Image Credit: Rawpixel)

It’s your first day on the job. You’ve adjusted your chair three times, changed the computer monitor’s brightness, and are starting to feel mighty uncomfortable, because this office is a maze and the bathroom is apparently hidden in another realm. But you’re settling in, slowly but surely. After a few days pass by (and thank the office gods, you’ve finally discovered where they keep the coffee maker), it’s time to make your cubicle space your own. After all, if you’re going to spend eight hours a day in a tiny, beige space, you might as well beautify it, right? Continue reading

How to Deal With A Boss That’s Not So Nice

(Image Credit: Marylam)

(Image Credit: Marylam)

Sometimes you get lucky and find a really good job – work that doesn’t feel like work, good pay, enjoyable coworkers, and a super nice boss. Other times….you don’t. Not every place of employment has a happy head honcho. But what can you do? I mean, besides quit. Continue reading

(Image Credit: Marzky Ragsac Jr.)

How (Not) To Write A Resume

(Image Credit: Marzky Ragsac Jr.)

(Image Credit: Marzky Ragsac Jr.)

Resumes are kind of ridiculous when you think about it. We list our accomplishments and skills on a neat little paper and turn it over to potential employers, internally screaming ‘Please like me! I’m good at stuff! See?’ Continue reading

(Image Credit: Laszlolorik)

The Grass Is Not Always Greener

(Image Credit: Laszlolorik)

(Image Credit: Laszlolorik)

I have this terrible habit. I think it started around the time I discovered the Travel Channel and Disney World (specifically Epcot: my 4 year old version of studying abroad), and then eventually worsened in my more “enlightened” years followed by Kerouac and Bukowski obsessions. The habit is one you might very well be suffering from too. The constant, and at times debilitating, theory that life could be better somewhere else, anywhere else for that matter. I have this philosophy that if I stay still too long, I’ll never move again. Stuck. A bleak life with little movement and growth, and it absolutely petrifies me. Continue reading

(Image Credit: Ashley Campbell)

Get Your Life Together

(Image Credit: Ashley Campbell)

(Image Credit: Ashley Campbell)

It’s easy to agonize about the state of one’s life and how much better things would be if one could just “get it together.” Clean up the mess of life and keep it neat and tidy. But “getting your life together” isn’t easy. There are times when such a feat may not even seem possible. Continue reading

(Image Credit: Florian Lehmuth)

Commuting Essentials for the First Timer

(Image Credit: Florian Lehmuth)

(Image Credit: Florian Lehmuth)

Whether you’re traveling by bus, bike, or train, being a first-time commuter can feel a bit overwhelming. Not only do you need to make sure you don’t show up to work unprepared, but you also will want to bring along some travel essentials to make your commute more enjoyable. Here are a few items that you might want to add to your checklist. Continue reading